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image: A Chill Issue

A Chill Issue

By | February 1, 2013

The very cold, the merely chilled, and the colorful

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image: Immune to Failure

Immune to Failure

By | February 1, 2013

With dogged persistence and an unwillingness to entertain defeat, Bruce Beutler discovered a receptor that powers the innate immune response to infections—and earned his share of a Nobel Prize.

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image: Rhinoviruses Exposed

Rhinoviruses Exposed

By | February 1, 2013

Some of these insidious viruses expertly subvert the host immune system, allowing their unhindered proliferation.

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image: Internalizing the Internet

Internalizing the Internet

By | January 23, 2013

Online social networks alter how users see themselves and their world.

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image: Universal Flu Vaccines Charge Ahead

Universal Flu Vaccines Charge Ahead

By | January 14, 2013

Researchers and biotech companies are bringing a universal flu vaccine closer to reality.

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image: Fast Worms

Fast Worms

By | January 1, 2013

A microfluidic device scans individual C. elegans for abnormal traits and sorts wild-type animals from mutants.

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image: Adipose Tissue Metabolism in the Obese

Adipose Tissue Metabolism in the Obese

By | December 12, 2012

Fat cells behave differently in obese individuals, causing inflammation and insulin resitance.

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image: Maggot Medicine

Maggot Medicine

By | December 10, 2012

The healing powers of maggots may lie in their secreted proteins, which restrain the human immune response.

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image: Normal Fat Tissue Metabolism

Normal Fat Tissue Metabolism

By | December 6, 2012

Adipose tissue plays an immune role in individuals of normal wieght.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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