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The Scientist

» technology and developmental biology

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image: Gigapixel Photography

Gigapixel Photography

By | June 22, 2012

Imagine a panoramic photograph with such high resolution that you could zoom in on a postage stamp more than half a mile away, or read signs that are blocks away from your vantage point. That is just what researchers at Duke University have created.

1 Comment

image: The Gigapixel Camera

The Gigapixel Camera

By | June 22, 2012

A single camera unit can capture a moment in time at a mind-boggling resolution.

1 Comment

image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

5 Comments

image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

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image: Electrified Snail

Electrified Snail

By | May 29, 2012

Enzyme-coated electrodes turn the tiny invertebrate into a powerful fuel cell.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Pressured to Commercialize

Opinion: Pressured to Commercialize

By | May 28, 2012

Is the push for science to save the still flailing economy a threat to scientific research?

5 Comments

image: Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

By | May 7, 2012

Human-specific duplications of a gene involved in brain development may have contributed to our species’ unique intelligence.

6 Comments

image: Stem Cell Suicide Switch

Stem Cell Suicide Switch

By | May 3, 2012

Human embryonic stem cells swiftly kill themselves in response to DNA damage.

10 Comments

image: The Sugar Lnc

The Sugar Lnc

By | May 1, 2012

Genes that react to cellular sugar content are regulated by a long non-coding RNA via an unexpected mechanism

2 Comments

image: Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

By | May 1, 2012

From accounts of deformed animals to scratch-and-sniff technology, Robert Boyle's early contributions to the Royal Society of London were prolific and wide ranging.

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