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image: Dolled-Up Turtles

Dolled-Up Turtles

By | November 1, 2012

Borrowing techniques from nail and hair salons, researchers have devised a method to tag small, previously untrackable sea turtles.

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image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

11 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Turtles and Fingertips

Turtles and Fingertips

By | November 1, 2012

Beauty salon technologies help researchers tag and follow young sea turtles like never before.

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image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | November 1, 2012

Large RNA-protein packets use a novel mechanism to escape the cell nucleus.

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image: Long and Rocky Roads

Long and Rocky Roads

By | November 1, 2012

From basic research to beneficial therapies

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image: Eggs Trade Genes

Eggs Trade Genes

By | October 24, 2012

Swapping chromosomes from one human egg to another could eliminate mitochondrial DNA mutations that cause disease.

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image: Softness Indicates Metastatic Cells

Softness Indicates Metastatic Cells

By | October 15, 2012

The tenderness of cancer cells squeezed by a special apparatus can help pinpoint the ones most likely to spread the disease.

2 Comments

image: Cloning Biologist Dies

Cloning Biologist Dies

By | October 12, 2012

Keith Campbell, a biologist who was part of the effort to clone Dolly the sheep, has passed away at the age of 58.

1 Comment

image: Home Cookin’

Home Cookin’

By | October 1, 2012

Laboratory-raised populations of dung beetles reveal a mother's extragenetic influence on the physiques of her sons.

2 Comments

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