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image: Fast Worms

Fast Worms

By | January 1, 2013

A microfluidic device scans individual C. elegans for abnormal traits and sorts wild-type animals from mutants.

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2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: Microchannel Masterpiece

Microchannel Masterpiece

By | December 1, 2012

A precision microfluidic system enables single-cell analysis of growth and division.

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Top 10 Innovations 2012

By | December 1, 2012

The Scientist’s 5th installment of its annual competition attracted submissions from across the life science spectrum. Here are the best and brightest products of the year.

5 Comments

image: Dolled-Up Turtles

Dolled-Up Turtles

By | November 1, 2012

Borrowing techniques from nail and hair salons, researchers have devised a method to tag small, previously untrackable sea turtles.

2 Comments

image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

11 Comments

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Contributors

By | November 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Turtles and Fingertips

Turtles and Fingertips

By | November 1, 2012

Beauty salon technologies help researchers tag and follow young sea turtles like never before.

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image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | November 1, 2012

Large RNA-protein packets use a novel mechanism to escape the cell nucleus.

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image: Long and Rocky Roads

Long and Rocky Roads

By | November 1, 2012

From basic research to beneficial therapies

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