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image: Mr. Epigenetics

Mr. Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Meet Wolf Reik, August Profilee and Babraham Institute director of research.

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image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

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image: The Prescient Placenta

The Prescient Placenta

By | August 1, 2015

The maternal-fetal interface plays important roles in the health of both mother and baby, even after birth.

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image: Optogenetics Meets CRISPR

Optogenetics Meets CRISPR

By | June 15, 2015

Researchers in Japan have developed a photoactivatable Cas9 nuclease to control CRISPR-based gene editing with the flip of a switch.

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image: TS Live: Genetic Time Machine

TS Live: Genetic Time Machine

By | June 12, 2015

Piecing together scraps of DNA from a 400,000-year-old hominin femur

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image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

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image: What’s Old Is New Again

What’s Old Is New Again

By | June 1, 2015

Revolutionary new methods for extracting, purifying, and sequencing ever-more-ancient DNA have opened an unprecedented window into the history of life on Earth.

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image: Oldest Stone Tools Discovered

Oldest Stone Tools Discovered

By | May 26, 2015

Researchers unearth 3.3 million-year-old stone flakes in Kenya, forcing a reimagining of the emergence of such technologies in the ancestors of humans.

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image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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