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image: Immunologist Falsified Data

Immunologist Falsified Data

By | August 6, 2012

A researcher from the John Wayne Cancer Institute has settled his scientific misconduct case with the Office of Research Integrity.

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image: Lymphatic Lines

Lymphatic Lines

By | August 1, 2012

Lymphatic vessels grow towards two chemokines, revealing signals that could be important in cancer metastasis.

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image: A Scientist Emerges

A Scientist Emerges

By | August 1, 2012

At age 16, Alexandra Sourakov has her first scientific publication, on the foraging behavior of butterflies.

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image: Skin Microbes Alter Immunity

Skin Microbes Alter Immunity

By | July 30, 2012

Like commensal gut organisms, skin microbiota appear to help the mammalian immune system mature and stay regulated.

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image: Wired to Run—and Think

Wired to Run—and Think

By | July 26, 2012

Evolving the ability to run may also have made our ancestors smarter, suggesting that exercise can be healthy for the brain as well as the body.

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image: Double Duplication

Double Duplication

By | July 24, 2012

Two whole genome duplications boosted the complexity of the ancestor of all vertebrates, but also introduced potential for disease.

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image: The Polar Bear’s Prehistoric Past

The Polar Bear’s Prehistoric Past

By | July 23, 2012

Genomic analyses reveal that the polar bear evolved between 4 and 5 million years ago, far earlier than previous studies had estimated.

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image: Sex Drives Chromosome Evolution

Sex Drives Chromosome Evolution

By | July 19, 2012

A relatively new pair of sex chromosomes in the fruit fly allows researchers to track their evolution from the beginning.

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image: Flies Evolve to Count

Flies Evolve to Count

By | July 12, 2012

Researchers breed fruit flies that, after 40 generations of conditioning, have acquired the ability to react to numbers.

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