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image: Syphilis: Then and Now

Syphilis: Then and Now

By , , and | February 1, 2014

Researchers are zeroing in on the origin of syphilis and related diseases, which continue to plague the human population some 500 years after the first documented case.

12 Comments

image: Bacteria by Design

Bacteria by Design

By | January 30, 2014

A survey of bacteria in a University of Oregon building reveals that architecture influences the indoor microbiome.

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image: <em>The Scientist</em> on The Pulse #3

The Scientist on The Pulse #3

By | January 28, 2014

Kerry Grens chats about ancient tooth decay, asthma, and fat cells.

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image: New River Dolphin

New River Dolphin

By | January 27, 2014

DNA sequencing study reveals a new river dolphin species in South America.

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image: <em>Drosophila</em>’s New Genes

Drosophila’s New Genes

By | January 23, 2014

An analysis of the transcriptomes of several fruit fly strains reveals dozens of possible de novo genes in each.

6 Comments

image: Person-to-Person H7N9?

Person-to-Person H7N9?

By | January 20, 2014

The death of a medical worker in China prompts worries that the virus can spread between humans.

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image: Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

By | January 20, 2014

Injection of microscopic particles of a plastic-like material protects mice from cardiac tissue damage following heart attack.

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image: Next Generation: Capturing the Body’s Energy

Next Generation: Capturing the Body’s Energy

By | January 20, 2014

Researchers build a device that harvests and stores energy from the mechanical movements of a beating heart.

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image: Gene Therapy Improves Sight

Gene Therapy Improves Sight

By | January 17, 2014

Patients progressing toward blindness now have better vision after a gene therapy trial.

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image: The Shared Perfumes of Queens

The Shared Perfumes of Queens

By | January 16, 2014

Ant, bee, and wasp queens emit a similar class of pheromones that sterilize their workers, hinting at a shared ancestry for these chemicals.

1 Comment

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