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Scientists are enlisting the help of pigeons, parrots, crows, jays, and other species to disprove the notion that human cognitive abilities are beyond those of other animals.

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Spruce and pine and have relied on similar genetic toolkits for climate adaptation despite millions of years of evolution.

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image: Elephant Footprints Create Habitat for Tiny Aquatic Creatures

Elephant Footprints Create Habitat for Tiny Aquatic Creatures

By | December 1, 2016

Researchers discover diverse communities of invertebrates inhabiting the water-filled tracks of elephants in Uganda.

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A family’s collection of antique microscope slides became a trove of genetic information about the eradicated European malaria pathogen.

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image: 2016 Top 10 Innovations: Honorable Mentions

2016 Top 10 Innovations: Honorable Mentions

By | December 1, 2016

These runners up to the Top 10 Innovations of 2016 caught our judges' attention.

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image: The Topography of Teeth

The Topography of Teeth

By | November 29, 2016

Intricate, digital maps of animals’ teeth, created using the same geographical tools used by mapmakers, may help researchers determine the diets of extinct species.

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image: Evolution May Have Deleted Neanderthal DNA

Evolution May Have Deleted Neanderthal DNA

By | November 9, 2016

Natural selection may be behind the dearth of Neanderthal DNA in modern humans.

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image: Ebola Evolved to Become More Infectious

Ebola Evolved to Become More Infectious

By | November 7, 2016

A mutation that appeared early in the 2014 outbreak made the virus more infectious in humans, scientists show.

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image: Sealing the Deal

Sealing the Deal

By | November 1, 2016

Irish researchers convert seals into remote oceanographic sensors by attaching tags containing temperature probes and other technologies to their heads.

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image: Protein Folding Pioneer Dies

Protein Folding Pioneer Dies

By | October 28, 2016

Susan Lindquist of MIT and the Whitehead Institute broke scientific ground on prions and heat shock proteins.

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