The Scientist

» citation analysis and immunology

Most Recent

image: Self-Citation Gender Gap

Self-Citation Gender Gap

By | March 18, 2014

A study suggests that female researchers do not cite their own work as often as their male colleagues do.

1 Comment

image: Report: Diversity Strengthens Publications

Report: Diversity Strengthens Publications

By | February 25, 2014

US scientists are more likely to coauthor papers with researchers of similar ethnicity to themselves, but manuscripts with a more diverse list of authors have greater impact, a study shows.


image: Week in Review: February 3–7

Week in Review: February 3–7

By | February 7, 2014

Federal stem cell regulations vary; Salmonella exploit host immune system; microglia help maintain synaptic connections; prosthesis re-creates feeling of touch


image: Immune Response Promotes Infection

Immune Response Promotes Infection

By | February 6, 2014

Salmonella enterica can exploit a standard immune response in mice to promote its own growth.


image: Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

By | February 2, 2014

Without microglia to pluck off unwanted synapses in early life, mouse brains develop with weaker connections, leading to altered social behavior.


image: The HHMI Bump

The HHMI Bump

By | January 28, 2014

A new study shows a slight citation benefit to authors recently awarded investigator status from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.


image: Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

By | January 20, 2014

Injection of microscopic particles of a plastic-like material protects mice from cardiac tissue damage following heart attack.

1 Comment

image: Google Scholar Going Strong

Google Scholar Going Strong

By | January 7, 2014

Despite persistent rumors of its demise, the academic publishing arm of the search engine juggernaut shows no signs of slowing.


image: How HIV Destroys Immune Cells

How HIV Destroys Immune Cells

By | December 19, 2013

During HIV infection, CD4 T cells in lymphoid tissues initiate a highly inflammatory form of cell death that helps cripple the immune system.  

1 Comment

image: Dogs, Dust Microbes, and Allergies

Dogs, Dust Microbes, and Allergies

By | December 16, 2013

Dust-borne bacteria from houses with dogs can prevent allergies in mice by changing their gut microbes.


Popular Now

  1. Inside a Lab Mouse’s High-Fat Diet
  2. Battling the Bulge
    Bio Business Battling the Bulge

    Weight-loss drugs that target newly characterized obesity-related receptors and pathways could finally offer truly effective fat control.

  3. How Gastric Bypass Can Kill Sugar Cravings
  4. Birth of the Skin Microbiome
    Daily News Birth of the Skin Microbiome

    The immune system tolerates the colonization of commensal bacteria on the skin with the aid of regulatory T cells during the first few weeks of life, a mouse study shows.

Life Technologies