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image: Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

By | September 21, 2016

According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

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Could the Relative Citation Ratio replace the oft maligned journal impact factor?

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image: Web of Science Sold for More Than $3 Billion

Web of Science Sold for More Than $3 Billion

By | July 15, 2016

Thomson Reuters has transferred the science-citation database, along with the rest of its intellectual property and science division, to private-equity firms.

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Researchers find that scientific papers with shorter titles accrue more citations only if they are very popular. For papers flying under the radar, longer titles fare better.

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Future Fields of Inquiry

By | March 7, 2016

Researchers propose an approach to identify new multidisciplinary interests in the sciences.

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image: A Literature Database with Smarts

A Literature Database with Smarts

By | November 3, 2015

Semantic Scholar uses machine reading and vision to extract meaning and impact from academic papers.

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image: Parsing Negative Citations

Parsing Negative Citations

By | October 26, 2015

A new tool helps scientists better understand what happens to studies that are criticized in the literature.

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image: Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

By | September 24, 2015

The information firm uses citation statistics to forecast potential winners of the 2015 Nobel Prizes in Chemistry and Physiology or Medicine.

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image: Study: Short Headlines Get More Citations

Study: Short Headlines Get More Citations

By | August 27, 2015

Scientific journals that publish papers with snappier titles accrue more citations per paper, according to a report.

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image: Publishing Partners

Publishing Partners

By | August 10, 2015

Collaborations can boost citations, a study shows.

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