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image: Finding Injury

Finding Injury

By | September 1, 2012

The brain’s phagocytes follow an ATP bread trail laid down by calcium waves to the site of damage.

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image: Playing Sides on Arctic Research

Playing Sides on Arctic Research

By | August 13, 2012

A polar bear researcher is being investigated for opposing oil and gas industry research initiative in the Arctic, while supporting a similar proposal from NOAA.

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image: Drug Abuse Study’s Ethics Questioned

Drug Abuse Study’s Ethics Questioned

By | August 6, 2012

An advocacy group claims that heroin addicts participating in a Chinese study were not in a position to give their informed consent.

1 Comment

image: Space-bound Fish

Space-bound Fish

By | July 31, 2012

Japanese astronauts deliver an aquarium to the International Space Station to study the effects of microgravity on marine life.

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image: Manipulating Eggs to Avoid Disease

Manipulating Eggs to Avoid Disease

By | June 13, 2012

A United Kingdom ethics council approves altering human egg cells, which could allow doctors to correct mitochondrial disease in IVF patients.

2 Comments

image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

5 Comments

image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

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image: Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

By | May 7, 2012

Human-specific duplications of a gene involved in brain development may have contributed to our species’ unique intelligence.

6 Comments

image: Stem Cell Suicide Switch

Stem Cell Suicide Switch

By | May 3, 2012

Human embryonic stem cells swiftly kill themselves in response to DNA damage.

10 Comments

image: The Sugar Lnc

The Sugar Lnc

By | May 1, 2012

Genes that react to cellular sugar content are regulated by a long non-coding RNA via an unexpected mechanism

2 Comments

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