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image: Hairy Situation for Wolves

Hairy Situation for Wolves

By | November 16, 2014

Researchers find high stress hormone levels in the hair of hunted wolves in Northern Canada.

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image: Butterfly Eyespots Deflect Predation

Butterfly Eyespots Deflect Predation

By | November 12, 2014

Researchers show that patterned coloration can be an effective means of distracting predators from vital body parts.

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image: Study: Scientists Witness Plagiarism Often

Study: Scientists Witness Plagiarism Often

By | November 3, 2014

A meta-analysis of surveys used to gauge plagiarism among scientists finds that nearly one-third of researchers have witnessed the problem.

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image: Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

By | October 20, 2014

Several toad, newt, and salamander populations are being hit hard by an emerging pathogen in a pristine national park in Spain.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: NIH Cleared of Tampering with Ethics Probe

NIH Cleared of Tampering with Ethics Probe

By | September 18, 2014

Government auditors absolve the National Institutes of Health of wrongdoing in the case of its involvement in an ethics investigation of a study involving premature babies.

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image: Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

By | September 11, 2014

Farms support less phylogenetically diverse bird populations than forests, but some farms are better than others.

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image: Six-Legged Syringes

Six-Legged Syringes

By | September 1, 2014

Researchers whose work requires that they draw blood from wild animals are finding unlikely collaborators in biting insects.

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image: The Iceman Cometh

The Iceman Cometh

By | September 1, 2014

Meet Ötzi, the Copper Age ice man who is helping scientists reconstruct changes in the population genetics of the red deer he hunted.

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image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.

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