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Obesity-associated microbiome composition can persist after weight loss, affecting the exchange of metabolites between a mouse and its resident bugs, researchers report.

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An X-ray laser technique allows researchers to capture each stage of photosystem II—in vivid detail—at room temperature.

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image: Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

By | November 18, 2016

E. coli cultured on the International Space Station show increased expression of genes related to starvation and acid-resistance responses, researchers report.

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image: Genetic Modification Improves Photosynthetic Efficiency

Genetic Modification Improves Photosynthetic Efficiency

By | November 17, 2016

Researchers enhance the photosynthetic yield of tobacco plants with genetic engineering.

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image: Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers describe the first known bacterial adhesion molecule that binds to frozen water. 

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Viruses of the Human Body

Viruses of the Human Body

By | November 1, 2016

Some of our resident viruses may be beneficial.

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image: The Human Virome

The Human Virome

By | November 1, 2016

Diverse viruses can be found commingling with human and bacteria cells in and on people’s bodies. Scientists are just beginning to understand how these viruses help and when they can turn pathogenic.

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image: Blue Leaf Special

Blue Leaf Special

By | October 26, 2016

Begonia plants capture extra light in the shade thanks to specialized structures in their chloroplasts.

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image: Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

By | October 12, 2016

Viruses are responsible for the majority of archaea deaths on the deep ocean floors, scientists show.

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