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image: Pinpointing the Culprit

Pinpointing the Culprit

By | June 1, 2017

Identifying immune cell subsets with CyTOF

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image: Self-Experimentation Led to the Discovery of IgE

Self-Experimentation Led to the Discovery of IgE

By | June 1, 2017

In the 1960s, immunologists took matters into their own hands—and under their own skin—to characterize an immunoglobulin involved in allergies.

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image: Infographic: A Body Without Food

Infographic: A Body Without Food

By | June 1, 2017

Mounting evidence suggests that intermittent fasting causes significant changes to various organs and tissue types.

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image: Infographic: Immune Irritation in the Gut

Infographic: Immune Irritation in the Gut

By | June 1, 2017

A look at how gluten affects patients with celiac disease

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image: No Place to Hide

No Place to Hide

By | May 31, 2017

Environmental DNA is tracking down difficult-to-detect species, from rock snot in the U.S. to cave salamanders in Croatia.

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image: Grad Student Acquitted in Thesis-Sharing Case

Grad Student Acquitted in Thesis-Sharing Case

By | May 25, 2017

Diego Gomez was facing jail time in Colombia for posting someone else’s copyrighted thesis online.

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image: Companies Pursue Diagnostics that Mine the Microbiome

Companies Pursue Diagnostics that Mine the Microbiome

By | May 23, 2017

Tests so far typically screen for risky patterns that may augment traditional types of clinical data.

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image: A Triple Threat

A Triple Threat

By | May 22, 2017

The mosquitoes that carry Zika may be able to transmit two other viruses at the same time.

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Harvesting lab-raised zebrafish based on their size led to differences in the activity of more than 4,000 genes, as well as changes in allele frequencies of those genes, in the fish that remained.

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image: More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

By | May 3, 2017

Scientists report that thiamethoxam exposure impairs bumblebees’ reproduction and honey bees’ ability to fly.

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