The Scientist

» diagnostics and ecology

Most Recent

image: Microfluidics Within Reach

Microfluidics Within Reach

By | March 9, 2015

A programmable, hand-operated microfluidic device could help researchers designing more-accessible diagnostics.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

1 Comment

image: Rapid Ebola Test Approved

Rapid Ebola Test Approved

By | February 24, 2015

The World Health Organization OKs the first 15-minute Ebola diagnostic test.

0 Comments

image: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Reframed

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Reframed

By | February 11, 2015

To more accurately reflect the condition, the Institute of Medicine recommends renaming it systemic exertion intolerance disease.

2 Comments

image: Smartphone Diagnostic

Smartphone Diagnostic

By | February 5, 2015

Researchers design a device that attaches to a smartphone to test for diverse infectious diseases from a drop of blood.

0 Comments

image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

1 Comment

image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.

0 Comments

image: Along Came a Spider

Along Came a Spider

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers are turning to venom peptides to protect crops from their most devastating pests.

2 Comments

image: A Race Against Extinction

A Race Against Extinction

By | December 1, 2014

Bat populations ravaged; hundreds of amphibian species driven to extinction; diverse groups of birds threatened. Taking risks will be necessary to control deadly wildlife pathogens.

3 Comments

image: Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

By | November 19, 2014

Researchers discover a densovirus that is associated with sea star wasting disease.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  2. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  3. Sequencing Reveals Genomic Diversity of the Human Brain
  4. Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts
    The Nutshell Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

    An open-access journal is trialing a peer-review process in which reviewers do not have access to the results or discussion sections of submitted papers.

RayBiotech