Most Recent

image: Refunds Coming to Theranos’s Arizona Customers

Refunds Coming to Theranos’s Arizona Customers

By | April 20, 2017

The blood-testing startup settles a legal dispute with the Arizona attorney general’s office.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Fungal Forms

Image of the Day: Fungal Forms

By | April 20, 2017

By sequencing and analyzing the genomes of more than 20 species of Penicillium fungi, researches uncovered genes encoding for numerous bioactive compounds, including antibiotics.

0 Comments

image: CRISPR-Based Nucleic Acid Test Debuts

CRISPR-Based Nucleic Acid Test Debuts

By | April 13, 2017

SHERLOCK combines CRISPR-Cas13a with isothermal RNA amplification to detect RNA and DNA with single-base specificity.

0 Comments

image: CRISPR Corrects Duchenne-Causing Mutations

CRISPR Corrects Duchenne-Causing Mutations

By | April 12, 2017

Using CRISPR-Cpf1 gene editing, researchers have fixed mutations that cause a form of muscular dystrophy in cultured human cardiomyocytes and a mouse model.

0 Comments

Scientists identify a mutation in the CRY1 gene in people with abnormal sleeping patterns.

0 Comments

23andMe customers can now receive information about genetic risk for diseases including Parkinson’s and celiac.

0 Comments

image: Viral Trigger for Celiac Disease?

Viral Trigger for Celiac Disease?

By | April 6, 2017

A common, seemingly benign human virus can trigger an immune response that leads to celiac disease in a mouse model, researchers show. 

3 Comments

Octopus, cuttlefish, and squid extensively edit messenger RNAs in an evolutionarily conserved process. 

0 Comments

image: Cross-Sample Sequencing Contamination Galore

Cross-Sample Sequencing Contamination Galore

By | April 5, 2017

Scientists conducting a large-scale, comparative transcriptomics project have inadvertently highlighted widespread contamination in sequencing data.

3 Comments

image: Mutations Linked to Secondary Cancers

Mutations Linked to Secondary Cancers

By | April 4, 2017

Childhood cancer survivors with mutations in certain cancer-risk genes have a higher risk of developing additional neoplasms later in life, according to research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Grass Routes
    Features Grass Routes

    Researchers are discovering a suite of new locations and functions of endocannabinoid receptors that play roles in sickness and in health.

  3. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  4. Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study
AAAS