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image: EU Reels in Subsidies for Ocean Fisheries

EU Reels in Subsidies for Ocean Fisheries

By | October 25, 2013

The European Parliament rejected a proposal designed to fund the construction of new fishing boats, instead opting to fund a project that aims to curtail overfishing.

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image: Influential Ecologist Dies

Influential Ecologist Dies

By | September 24, 2013

Ruth Patrick, who pioneered freshwater pollution monitoring, has passed away at age 105.

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image: A Farewell  to Parasites

A Farewell to Parasites

By | September 1, 2013

Despite a fierce civil war, scientists led a 14-year grassroots campaign that has eradicated a parasitic disease from northern Sudan.

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image: Out of Sight

Out of Sight

By | September 1, 2013

The community-based healthcare effort that helped stamp out river blindness in one area of Sudan

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image: Fighting River Blindness

Fighting River Blindness

By | September 1, 2013

The debilitating parasitic disease, onchocerciasis, is all but vanquished in one corner of Sudan, thanks to a community-wide health effort.

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image: Dolphins by Name

Dolphins by Name

By | July 23, 2013

Bottlenose dolphins can recognize and respond to their own “signature whistles,” strengthening the evidence that these whistles function like names.

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image: Research Behind Bars

Research Behind Bars

By | July 1, 2013

Ecologist Nalini Nadkarni advances forest conservation and science advocacy by enlisting the help of prisoners.

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image: Science on Lockdown

Science on Lockdown

By | July 1, 2013

A forest ecologist comes down from the canopy to bring science to the masses, forming a series of improbable collaborations with prisoners.

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image: Sea Bugs

Sea Bugs

By | July 1, 2013

Ocean viruses can impact marine ecosystems in several ways.

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image: An Ocean of Viruses

An Ocean of Viruses

By | July 1, 2013

Viruses abound in the world’s oceans, yet researchers are only beginning to understand how they affect life and chemistry from the water’s surface to the sea floor.

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