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image: An Ocean of Viruses

An Ocean of Viruses

By | July 1, 2013

Viruses abound in the world’s oceans, yet researchers are only beginning to understand how they affect life and chemistry from the water’s surface to the sea floor.

3 Comments

image: Bird Bullies

Bird Bullies

By | June 1, 2013

Regular supplies of food for scavenger birds in Spain may not be the most effective conservation strategy, as smaller birds are bullied away.

1 Comment

image: Making Good on Research

Making Good on Research

By | June 1, 2013

Scientists working in developing nations who engage in capacity building find it bolsters the lives of locals and their own work.

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image: Mary O’Connor: Warming Up

Mary O’Connor: Warming Up

By | June 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia. Age: 34

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image: Misconduct Around the Globe

Misconduct Around the Globe

By | June 1, 2013

Research misconduct is not limited to the developed world, but few countries anywhere are responding adequately.

3 Comments

image: Salamander Evolution

Salamander Evolution

By | June 1, 2013

Yale University evolutionary biologist Steven Brady studies the evolutionary impacts of roads on the amphibians.

2 Comments

image: It Takes a Village

It Takes a Village

By | June 1, 2013

Scientists working in developing countries find that giving back to local communities enriches their own research.

3 Comments

image: Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

By | May 23, 2013

Researchers discover a microbe living at -15°C, the coldest temperature ever reported for bacterial growth, giving hope to the search for life elsewhere in the cosmos.

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image: Ladybird Bioterrorists

Ladybird Bioterrorists

By | May 16, 2013

The Asian harlequin ladybird carries a biological weapon to wipe out competing species.

4 Comments

image: Plants Communicate with Help of Fungi

Plants Communicate with Help of Fungi

By | May 14, 2013

Symbiotic fungi on the roots of bean plants can act as an underground signaling network, transmitting early warnings of impending aphid attacks.  

1 Comment

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