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image: New Virus Discovered in Human Blood

New Virus Discovered in Human Blood

By | September 23, 2015

Researchers identify a novel virus in blood samples taken in the 1970s.

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image: TS Picks: September 21, 2015

TS Picks: September 21, 2015

By | September 21, 2015

Blood-cleansing device; handheld sequencer; reference human genomes

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image: Whaling Specimens, 1930s

Whaling Specimens, 1930s

By | September 1, 2015

Fetal specimens collected by commercial whalers offer insights into how whales may have evolved their specialized hearing organs.

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image: Q&A: Placental Ponderings

Q&A: Placental Ponderings

By | August 27, 2015

Biologist Christopher Coe answers readers’ questions about the prescient organ.

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image: Illumina, Investors Launch Consumer Genetics Firm

Illumina, Investors Launch Consumer Genetics Firm

By | August 19, 2015

With $100 million in initial funding, Helix aims to make personal genomics accessible.

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image: A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

By | August 1, 2015

This year marks the 150th anniversary of an autopsy report describing the first known case of a sexual development disorder.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | August 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Leaving an Imprint

Leaving an Imprint

By | August 1, 2015

Among the first to discover epigenetic reprogramming during mammalian development, Wolf Reik has been studying the dynamics of the epigenome for 30 years.

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image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: Mr. Epigenetics

Mr. Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Meet Wolf Reik, August Profilee and Babraham Institute director of research.

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