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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.


image: Contributors


By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.


image: Parallel Plagues

Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.


A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.


image: Spoiler Alert

Spoiler Alert

By | March 1, 2016

How to store microbiome samples without losing or altering diversity

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image: Nanopore Sequencing Lawsuit

Nanopore Sequencing Lawsuit

By | February 29, 2016

Illumina accuses Oxford Nanopore Technologies of developing nanopore-based sequencing strategies covered by its patents.


image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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image: Keep Off the Grass

Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.


image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37


image: Year in Review: Spotlight on Ancient DNA

Year in Review: Spotlight on Ancient DNA

By | December 30, 2015

Several studies using centuries-old genetic material graced the pages of life-science journals in 2015. Here’s a look at a few of the researchers and papers that made headlines this year.

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