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BD Biosciences

The Scientist

» next-gen sequencing and ecology

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image: Waiting in the Wings

Waiting in the Wings

By | December 1, 2013

A century’s worth of collected butterflies shed light on how climate change threatens the survival of early-emerging species.

1 Comment

image: Virginia Targets Wild Pigs

Virginia Targets Wild Pigs

By | November 26, 2013

The state assembles a task force to try to slow the growth of burgeoning populations of the ecologically destructive invasive species.

2 Comments

image: Carp Breed in Great Lakes Watershed

Carp Breed in Great Lakes Watershed

By | October 29, 2013

New evidence indicates that invasive Asian carp have bred in the Lake Erie basin.

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image: EU Reels in Subsidies for Ocean Fisheries

EU Reels in Subsidies for Ocean Fisheries

By | October 25, 2013

The European Parliament rejected a proposal designed to fund the construction of new fishing boats, instead opting to fund a project that aims to curtail overfishing.

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image: Influential Ecologist Dies

Influential Ecologist Dies

By | September 24, 2013

Ruth Patrick, who pioneered freshwater pollution monitoring, has passed away at age 105.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Standards Needed

Opinion: Standards Needed

By | September 18, 2013

The success of genome sequencing hinges on technology standardization and coordinated efforts among scientists, bioinformaticians, and physicians.

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image: Jurassic Bummer

Jurassic Bummer

By | September 12, 2013

Researchers find that extracting dinosaur DNA from insects embedded in ancient amber is likely impossible.

1 Comment

image: Sequencing Mummies

Sequencing Mummies

By | August 1, 2013

Peek inside the South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology in Italy, where researchers are unravelling the DNA of centuries-old mummies.

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image: The Mummy Code

The Mummy Code

By | August 1, 2013

Ancient-DNA researchers have long clashed over work on Egyptian mummies, but next-gen sequencing might resolve their debates.

3 Comments

image: Dolphins by Name

Dolphins by Name

By | July 23, 2013

Bottlenose dolphins can recognize and respond to their own “signature whistles,” strengthening the evidence that these whistles function like names.

2 Comments

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