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image: Bridging a Gap in the Brain

Bridging a Gap in the Brain

By | October 12, 2016

Neuroscientists identify how the left and right hemispheres of the mammalian brain connect during development.

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image: Who Is Immune to Zika?

Who Is Immune to Zika?

By | October 11, 2016

Researchers tap into ongoing dengue studies to improve antibody-based diagnostic tests for Zika and address unanswered questions about the emerging virus’s epidemiology.

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image: Study: Enriched Housing Changes Murine T Cells

Study: Enriched Housing Changes Murine T Cells

By | October 3, 2016

Mice that live in a more-stimulating environment for two weeks appear to develop a more-inflammatory immune state that might help protect the animals against infection. 

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image: Protozoans Found With No Dedicated Stop Codons

Protozoans Found With No Dedicated Stop Codons

By | October 1, 2016

Some ciliates use the same trio of nucleotides to code for an amino acid and to stop translation.

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image: Saving Jon

Saving Jon

By | October 1, 2016

Meet the researcher/entrepreneur who started a nonprofit that seeks to solve the science behind a rare disease that threatens the life of her younger brother.

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image: Scientists Catch Translation in the Act

Scientists Catch Translation in the Act

By | October 1, 2016

Newly developed techniques from four different groups rely on the same basic steps to track translation in live cells.

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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image: What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

By | September 1, 2016

Odor, taste, and light receptors are present in many different parts of the body, and they have surprisingly diverse functions.

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image: One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

By | August 31, 2016

Host and bacterial ligands that interact with the same cell-surface receptor induce different activities in human macrophages. 

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