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image: Start Making Sense

Start Making Sense

By | June 1, 2016

Scientific progress is only achieved when humans' innate sense of understanding is validated by objective reality.


Caltech’s Frances Arnold is honored for her work on directed evolution.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | May 17, 2016

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes  


image: Further Evidence that Life Might Have Started with RNA

Further Evidence that Life Might Have Started with RNA

By | May 13, 2016

Researchers show how RNA bases could self-assemble in conditions that might resemble Earth’s primordial soup.

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image: Mysterious Eukaryote Missing Mitochondria

Mysterious Eukaryote Missing Mitochondria

By | May 12, 2016

Researchers uncover the first example of a eukaryotic organism that lacks the organelles.


image: Another Andrew Wakefield Movie in the Works

Another Andrew Wakefield Movie in the Works

By | May 4, 2016

This one will be largely based on the discredited anti-vaccine researcher’s 2010 book.


image: Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

By | May 4, 2016

Contrary to the popular thought that many species are “unculturable,” the majority of bacteria known to populate the human gut can be grown in the lab, scientists show.


In the book's prologue, author Frans de Waal considers the intellectual impediments to studying animal intelligence.


image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2016

Sorting the Beef from the Bull, Cheats and Deceits, A Sea of Glass, and Following the Wild Bees


image: Feeling Around in the Dark

Feeling Around in the Dark

By | May 1, 2016

Scientists work to unlock the genetic secrets of a population of fruit flies kept in total darkness for more than six decades.


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