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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Gel Scaffolds for Delivery of Immunotherapies

Gel Scaffolds for Delivery of Immunotherapies

By | April 1, 2017

Using biocompatible polymers to carry cancer immune therapies directly to the tumor

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image: Location, Location, Location

Location, Location, Location

By | April 1, 2017

Since first proposing that a cell’s function and biology depend on its surroundings, Mina Bissell continues to probe the role of the extracellular matrix.

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image: Tracking the Evolutionary History of a Tumor

Tracking the Evolutionary History of a Tumor

By | April 1, 2017

Analyzing single cell sequences to decipher the evolution of a tumor

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image: How Cancers Evolve Drug Resistance

How Cancers Evolve Drug Resistance

By | April 1, 2017

Researchers unravel the sophisticated ways cancers evade treatments, including immunotherapies, designed to destroy them.

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image: Neoantigens Enable Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy

Neoantigens Enable Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy

By | April 1, 2017

Tumors’ mutations can encode the seeds of their own destruction, in the form of immunogenic peptides recognized by T cells.

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image: Infographic: Targeting Cancer Antigens

Infographic: Targeting Cancer Antigens

By | April 1, 2017

Neoantigens may serve as valuable targets for new immunotherapies.

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image: In Certain Social Bees, Gut Microbiomes Follow Phylogeny

In Certain Social Bees, Gut Microbiomes Follow Phylogeny

By | March 29, 2017

Corbiculate bees and their gut-dwelling microbes have been coevolving since the social species evolved from their solitary ancestors around 80 million years ago, scientists suggest. 

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image: DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk

DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk

By | March 23, 2017

A follow-up study confirms that random mutations acquired during normal stem cell division likely play a major role in cancer incidence.

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image: Inflammation Drives Gut Bacteria Evolution

Inflammation Drives Gut Bacteria Evolution

By | March 16, 2017

Viruses within Salmonella rapidly spread genes throughout the bacterial population during a gut infection, scientists show.

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