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image: Shooting for the Moon

Shooting for the Moon

By | April 1, 2016

Defeating cancer is many times more difficult than planting a flag on our lunar satellite.

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Speaking of Science

By | April 1, 2016

April 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: A Different Way of Doing Things

A Different Way of Doing Things

By | April 1, 2016

Cancer cells exhibit altered metabolic processes that may serve as promising targets for new therapies.

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image: Immune Influence

Immune Influence

By | April 1, 2016

In recent years, research has demonstrated that microbes living in and on the mammalian body can affect cancer risk, as well as responses to cancer treatment.

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image: Metabolic Reprogramming

Metabolic Reprogramming

By | April 1, 2016

How cancer cells fuel their rapid growth

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image: Microbes Meet Cancer

Microbes Meet Cancer

By | April 1, 2016

Understanding cancer’s relationship with the human microbiome could transform immune-modulating therapies.

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image: The Forces of Cancer

The Forces of Cancer

By | April 1, 2016

A tumor’s physical environment fuels its growth and causes treatment resistance.

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Under Pressure

By | April 1, 2016

The causes and consequences of physical forces in the tumor microenvironment

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image: Book Review: <em>Personal Trials</em>

Book Review: Personal Trials

By | March 22, 2016

At first blush, do-it-yourself clinical trials seem pointless and reckless. But a deeper truth pervades the research and the patients who drive it forward.

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image: The 2016 Salary Survey Is Here

The 2016 Salary Survey Is Here

By | March 18, 2016

Answer some brief questions and help us determine the most current salary outlook for life scientists and earn a chance to win a $100 Amazon gift card.

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