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» adaptation and immunology

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image: NK Cell Diversity and Viral Risk

NK Cell Diversity and Viral Risk

By | July 22, 2015

A small study links the diversity of a person’s natural killer cell repertoire to risk of HIV infection following exposure to the virus.

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image: Our Primitive Hands

Our Primitive Hands

By | July 15, 2015

New research suggests that the form of the human hand has been around for a lot longer than previously thought.

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image: Novel Hantavirus Infection Method

Novel Hantavirus Infection Method

By | July 3, 2015

Researchers find that the potentially deadly virus uses cholesterol to gain access to cells.

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image: Brrrr-ying the Results

Brrrr-ying the Results

By | July 1, 2015

Holding laboratory mice at temperatures lower than those the animals prefer could be altering their physiology and skewing experimental results.

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image: High-Flying Ducks

High-Flying Ducks

By | July 1, 2015

Five species of waterfowl have evolved a variety of adaptations to adjust to the high altitude of South America’s Lake Titicaca.

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image: Diagnosing Ebola in 15 Minutes

Diagnosing Ebola in 15 Minutes

By | June 30, 2015

A new test that scans for the Ebola virus with just a fingerprick could be a practical diagnostic for use in West Africa.

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image: Sex Differences in Pain Pathway

Sex Differences in Pain Pathway

By | June 29, 2015

Male and female mice utilize different immune cells to process pain, a study shows.

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image: Neutralizing HIV

Neutralizing HIV

By | June 18, 2015

Engineered immunogens based on conserved patches of the virus’s envelope protein point to new strategies for vaccine design.

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image: Brain Drain

Brain Drain

By | June 1, 2015

The brain contains lymphatic vessels similar to those found elsewhere in the body, a mouse study shows.

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image: Adapting to Arsenic

Adapting to Arsenic

By | June 1, 2015

Andean communities may have evolved the ability to metabolize arsenic, a trait that could be the first documented example of a toxic substance acting as an agent of natural selection in humans.

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