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High-Flying Ducks

By | July 1, 2015

Five species of waterfowl have evolved a variety of adaptations to adjust to the high altitude of South America’s Lake Titicaca.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | July 1, 2015

July 2015's selection of notable quotes


image: Staying Active in the Lab

Staying Active in the Lab

By | July 1, 2015

Retiring as a professor, and even shutting down your own lab, doesn’t necessarily mean quitting research.


image: The War Rages On

The War Rages On

By | July 1, 2015

Conflict between science and religion continues, with effects on health, politics, and the environment.


image: Keeping Science Pubs Clean

Keeping Science Pubs Clean

By | June 29, 2015

Science releases new guidelines for research transparency, hoping to stem the tide of retractions and misconduct.


image: Adapting to Arsenic

Adapting to Arsenic

By | June 1, 2015

Andean communities may have evolved the ability to metabolize arsenic, a trait that could be the first documented example of a toxic substance acting as an agent of natural selection in humans.

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In the prologue, “Lemurs and the Delights of Fieldwork,” author Ian Tattersall shares the paleoanthropological lessons he learned from studying non-human primates in Madagascar.


image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | June 1, 2015

How to Clone a Mammoth, The Upright Thinkers, The Thirteenth Step, and Humankind


image: Reimagining Humanity

Reimagining Humanity

By | June 1, 2015

As the science of paleoanthropology developed, human evolutionary trees changed as much as the minds that constructed them.


While some in the scientific and religious communities have declared an end to the tensions between faith and fact, the conflict continues to have impacts on health, politics, and the environment.


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