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Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

By | September 25, 2014

Using citation statistics, the firm forecasts which researchers are likely to take home science’s top honors this year.

2 Comments

image: Heritable Histones

Heritable Histones

By | September 18, 2014

Scientists show how roundworm daughter cells remember the histone modification patterns of their parents.

3 Comments

image: Giant DNA Origami

Giant DNA Origami

By | September 18, 2014

Researchers create the largest 3-D DNA structures to date, many times bigger than previously constructed origami shapes.

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image: Did <em>Spinosaurus </em> Swim?

Did Spinosaurus Swim?

By | September 15, 2014

Most complete skeleton suggests the dinosaurs were semi-aquatic hunters. 

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Crossing Boundaries

By | September 1, 2014

A groundbreaker in the study of Listeria monocytogenes, Pascale Cossart continues to build her research tool kit to understand how to fight such intracellular human pathogens.

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Entry Requirements

By | September 1, 2014

Recent developments in cell transfection and molecular delivery technologies

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image: How Hummingbirds Taste Nectar

How Hummingbirds Taste Nectar

By | August 21, 2014

Hummingbirds perceive sweetness through a receptor with which other vertebrates taste savory foods. 

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Contributors

By | August 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Seeds of Hopelessness

Seeds of Hopelessness

By | August 1, 2014

Can seed banks adequately prepare for the future if wild plant populations are already lagging behind in adapting to rapid climate change?

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image: Small Packages

Small Packages

By | August 1, 2014

When proverbs come true

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