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image: Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

By | June 7, 2013

In avian species, a gene induces programmed cell death during development in the area where a phallus would otherwise grow.

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image: Evolution Takes a Road Trip

Evolution Takes a Road Trip

By | June 1, 2013

Highways and byways are among the man-made environmental alterations driving the evolution of animals on contemporary timescales, with implications for ecology.

3 Comments

image: Loss of Potential

Loss of Potential

By | June 1, 2013

In the fruit fly, the ability of neural stem cells to make the full repertoire of neurons is regulated by the movement of key genes to the nuclear periphery.

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image: Epigenetics of Embryonic Stem Cells

Epigenetics of Embryonic Stem Cells

By | May 14, 2013

Researchers track DNA modifications and gene expression in stem cells as they differentiate.

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image: Icy Veins

Icy Veins

By | April 2, 2013

Intrepid Norwegian explorers discovered the Antarctic icefish, a marvel of evolution, while venturing to an island at the bottom of the Earth in 1927.

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image:

"White-Blooded" Icefish, 1927

By | April 1, 2013

A bizarre group of Antarctic fishes lost their red blood cells but survived to tell their evolutionary tale, revealing a fundamental lesson about the birth and death of genes.

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 1, 2013

Satellites of the Golgi apparatus generate the microtubules used to grow outer dendrite branches in Drosophila neurons.

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image: Pluripotent Until Needed

Pluripotent Until Needed

By | April 1, 2013

Microarrays help keep induced pluripotent stem cell lines in check, from start to finish.

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image: Smurf-y Old Age

Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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