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Researchers solve the mystery of 15-year-old mutant ferns with disrupted sex determination.

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image: Adaptation, Island Style

Adaptation, Island Style

By | January 3, 2017

Anole lizards inhabiting the Caribbean islands display some of the key principles of evolution.

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image: Corals Show Genetic Plasticity

Corals Show Genetic Plasticity

By | November 7, 2016

Inshore corals thrive in a chaotic ecosystem thanks to dynamic gene-expression regulation, which may help the marine invertebrates better adapt to rising sea surface temperatures.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | May 17, 2016

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes  

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image: Feeling Around in the Dark

Feeling Around in the Dark

By | May 1, 2016

Scientists work to unlock the genetic secrets of a population of fruit flies kept in total darkness for more than six decades.

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image: Shingo Kajimura: Fishing for Answers

Shingo Kajimura: Fishing for Answers

By | November 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Department of Cell and Tissue Biology, University of California, San Francisco. Age: 39

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image: Our Primitive Hands

Our Primitive Hands

By | July 15, 2015

New research suggests that the form of the human hand has been around for a lot longer than previously thought.

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image: High-Flying Ducks

High-Flying Ducks

By | July 1, 2015

Five species of waterfowl have evolved a variety of adaptations to adjust to the high altitude of South America’s Lake Titicaca.

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image: Adapting to Arsenic

Adapting to Arsenic

By | June 1, 2015

Andean communities may have evolved the ability to metabolize arsenic, a trait that could be the first documented example of a toxic substance acting as an agent of natural selection in humans.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Unnatural Selection</em>

Book Excerpt from Unnatural Selection

By | October 1, 2014

In chapter 5, “Resurgence: Bedbugs Bite Back,” author Emily Monosson chronicles the rise of the pesky pests in the face of humanity’s best chemical efforts.

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