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QIAGEN Ingenuity
QIAGEN Ingenuity

The Scientist

» rare diseases, microbiology and evolution

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image: Pumpkins Saved By People?

Pumpkins Saved By People?

By | November 25, 2015

Domestication may have saved pumpkins, gourds, and squash as seed dispersers like the mastodon went extinct. 

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image: Farming Sped Eurasian Evolution

Farming Sped Eurasian Evolution

By | November 24, 2015

New clues from ancient DNA reveal the remarkable effect of agriculture on adaptation in Stone Age humans who lived across Europe.

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image: Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

By | November 24, 2015

One large provider says the shortfall should clear up by early 2016.

1 Comment

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | November 19, 2015

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

2 Comments

image: Rethinking the Rise of Mammals

Rethinking the Rise of Mammals

By | November 16, 2015

Mammals diversified 30 million years later than previously estimated, according to a new analysis of an ancient fossil.

3 Comments

image: Blood-Gut Barrier

Blood-Gut Barrier

By | November 12, 2015

Scientists identify a barrier in mice between the intestine and its blood supply, and suggest how Salmonella sneaks through it.

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image: Exploring the Inner Universe

Exploring the Inner Universe

By | November 6, 2015

A new American Museum of Natural History exhibit introduces visitors to the microbes within their bodies. 

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image: Shire Buys Rare Disease Drug Developer

Shire Buys Rare Disease Drug Developer

By | November 2, 2015

The Irish drugmaker is set to acquire the Massachusetts-based Dyax in a $5.9 billion deal.

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image: A Tiny Missing Link?

A Tiny Missing Link?

By | November 2, 2015

The common ancestor of all apes, including great apes and humans, may have been not-so-great in stature.

2 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2015

The Psychology of Overeating, The Hidden Half of Nature, The Death of Cancer, and The Secret of Our Success

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