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A transposon underlies this classic story of evolutionary adaptation.

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image: Generating Cardiac Precursor Cells

Generating Cardiac Precursor Cells

By | June 1, 2016

Researchers derive cardiac precursors to form cardiac muscle, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells in mice.


image: Myriad, Post Mortem

Myriad, Post Mortem

By | June 1, 2016

David Schwartz of the Illinois Institute of Technology-Chicago, Kent College of Law, discusses the impact of the US Supreme Court unanimously striking down Myriad Genetics' patent of human BRCA genes and tests to detect mutations in them.


image: Start Making Sense

Start Making Sense

By | June 1, 2016

Scientific progress is only achieved when humans' innate sense of understanding is validated by objective reality.


image: The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

By | June 1, 2016

In failing hearts, cardiomyocytes change their fuel preference.

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image: In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

By | June 1, 2016

While the heart cells normally burn fatty acids, when things go wrong ketones become the preferred fuel source.


image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.


Caltech’s Frances Arnold is honored for her work on directed evolution.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | May 17, 2016

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes  


image: Mysterious Eukaryote Missing Mitochondria

Mysterious Eukaryote Missing Mitochondria

By | May 12, 2016

Researchers uncover the first example of a eukaryotic organism that lacks the organelles.


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