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» BRCA1 and developmental biology

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Home Cookin’

By | October 1, 2012

Laboratory-raised populations of dung beetles reveal a mother's extragenetic influence on the physiques of her sons.

2 Comments

image: Neglected Babies Develop Less Myelin

Neglected Babies Develop Less Myelin

By | September 17, 2012

Mice raised in isolation from their mothers developed cognitive deficits similar to those of babies raised in orphanages where physical contact is infrequent.

2 Comments

image: Finding Injury

Finding Injury

By | September 1, 2012

The brain’s phagocytes follow an ATP bread trail laid down by calcium waves to the site of damage.

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image: Court Rules Gene Patents Valid

Court Rules Gene Patents Valid

By | August 17, 2012

Myriad Genetics can hold patents on the BRAC1 and BRAC2 oncogenes, but not on tests comparing DNA sequences.

8 Comments

image: Space-bound Fish

Space-bound Fish

By | July 31, 2012

Japanese astronauts deliver an aquarium to the International Space Station to study the effects of microgravity on marine life.

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image: Gene Patents Back in Court

Gene Patents Back in Court

By | June 19, 2012

A public interest legal group has renewed the fight against DNA patenting.

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image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

5 Comments

image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

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image: Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

By | May 7, 2012

Human-specific duplications of a gene involved in brain development may have contributed to our species’ unique intelligence.

6 Comments

image: Stem Cell Suicide Switch

Stem Cell Suicide Switch

By | May 3, 2012

Human embryonic stem cells swiftly kill themselves in response to DNA damage.

10 Comments

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