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By ditching traditional agar-based media, two biochemists captured iconic images of Myxococcus in 1982.

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image: Riboswitch Screen

Riboswitch Screen

By | August 1, 2016

A newly developed method detects regulators of bacterial transcription called riboswitches.

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image: Wanted: Transcriptional Regulators

Wanted: Transcriptional Regulators

By | August 1, 2016

Researchers have designed a screen to find unique molecules, called riboswitches, that determine whether transcription will proceed.

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image: Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised

Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised

By | July 25, 2016

The partnering of an alga and a fungus to make lichen may be only two-thirds of the equation.

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image: Different Brains, Similar Wiring

Different Brains, Similar Wiring

By | July 22, 2016

The brains of primates and mice follow the same exponential rule of connectivity, according to a study.

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image: Donor-Soil Microbes Drive Ecosystem Restoration

Donor-Soil Microbes Drive Ecosystem Restoration

By | July 11, 2016

Excavating existing topsoil and adding donor soil, researchers revitalized degraded farmland in the span of six years.

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image: A New Role for Marine Archaea

A New Role for Marine Archaea

By | July 1, 2016

Researchers discover acetogenesis in archaea, suggesting an important role for these little-studied organisms in generating organic carbon below the seafloor.

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image: Archaea’s Role in Carbon Cycle

Archaea’s Role in Carbon Cycle

By | July 1, 2016

Bathyarchaeota undergo acetogenesis, generating organic carbon below the seafloor.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: Is Bilingualism Good for Kids?

Is Bilingualism Good for Kids?

By | July 1, 2016

New research suggests that raising kids in a dual-language environment might be better for their verbal development than previously realized.  

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