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Sex on the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Masculinization of the developing rodent brain leads to significant structural differences between the two sexes.

1 Comment

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Contributors

By | October 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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Speaking of Science

By | October 1, 2015

October 2015's selection of notable quotes

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Special Delivery

By | October 1, 2015

Neurons in new brains and old

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Sex Differences in the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

How male and female brains diverge is a hotly debated topic, but the study of model organisms points to differences that cannot be ignored.

27 Comments

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Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.

5 Comments

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Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.

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Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

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Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

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