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image: Cancer Not Just “Bad Luck”

Cancer Not Just “Bad Luck”

By | December 18, 2015

A new study refutes one published earlier this year that claimed random mutations were at the root of many tumors.

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image: Algal Toxin Hurts Sea Lion Memory

Algal Toxin Hurts Sea Lion Memory

By | December 16, 2015

Results could explain why the marine mammals have been stranding on the West coast in record numbers.

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image: One Gene, Two Disorders

One Gene, Two Disorders

By | December 11, 2015

Researchers link different mutations in a single gene to autistic and schizophrenic phenotypes in mice.

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image: Complications of Brain Manipulations

Complications of Brain Manipulations

By | December 9, 2015

The complex connectivities of mammalian and avian brains can confound the outcomes of transient neural manipulations, researchers show.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2015

Welcome to the Microbiome, The Paradox of Evolution, Newton's Apple, and Dawn of the Neuron.

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

By | November 30, 2015

The cancer-related protein BRCA1 is important for learning and memory in mice and is depleted in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, according to a study.

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image: Cortical Census

Cortical Census

By | November 26, 2015

Scientists document the characteristics and connections of mouse neocortical neurons to establish the most detailed microcircuit map to date.

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image: Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

By | November 24, 2015

Bacteria in the intestine produce proteins that stop rodents from eating.

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image: Opinion: Brain Scans in the Courtroom

Opinion: Brain Scans in the Courtroom

By | November 23, 2015

Advances in neuroimaging have improved our understanding of the brain, but the resulting data do little to help judges and juries determine criminal culpability.

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