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image: Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

By | April 21, 2016

Housing laboratory mice with those reared in a pet store makes the lab rodents’ immune systems more similar to those of people.

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image: Advances in Genome Editing

Advances in Genome Editing

By | April 20, 2016

Researchers develop a CRISPR-based technique that efficiently corrects point mutations without cleaving DNA.

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image: AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

By | April 18, 2016

The genomics pioneer shares the sessions she most looks forward to at this year’s American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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image: Genetic Resilience

Genetic Resilience

By | April 11, 2016

An analysis of the genomes of nearly 600,000 healthy individuals reveals a handful of people who appear resistant to certain genetic disorders.

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image: Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

By | April 7, 2016

The immune cells—known for clearing dead cells—also chew up live progenitors in neurogenic regions of mouse brains. 

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image: One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

By | April 5, 2016

Certain immune cells surrounding the organ appear to block viral entry.

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image: A Tree  Takes Root

A Tree Takes Root

By | April 1, 2016

Four apparently unrelated individuals share a common ancestor from whom they inherited a rare mutation that predisposed them to the cancer they share.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Pulling It All Together

Pulling It All Together

By | April 1, 2016

Systems-biology approaches offer new strategies for finding hard-to-identify drug targets for cancer.

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image: Tumor Traps

Tumor Traps

By | April 1, 2016

After surgery to remove a tumor, neutrophils recruited to the site spit out sticky webs of DNA that aid cancer recurrence.

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