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image: Scientists Edit Viable Human Embryos in U.S.

Scientists Edit Viable Human Embryos in U.S.

By | July 27, 2017

The embryos, whose genes were altered by CRISPR, were not intended for implantation. 

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Two freely available databases include data on hundreds of human cancer cell lines. 

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image: Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study

Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study

By | July 17, 2017

An estimate derived from fertility rates concludes that at least 75 percent of our DNA has no critical utility.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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image: First Genetic Screen of Pigs Using ENU

First Genetic Screen of Pigs Using ENU

By | July 14, 2017

Using the mutagenic chemical N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea, researchers confirm the role of a gene in a piglet deformity and identify potential models for human diseases. 

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Genomic analysis of an oak tree that lived during Napoleon’s time supports the idea that plants somehow avoid the accumulation of mutations in their stem cells.

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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

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The publicly available database found nearly a third of samples included mutations targeted by either approved drugs or therapies in clinical trials. 

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

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