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image: How Multicellularity Arose

How Multicellularity Arose

By | January 11, 2016

Researchers identify a molecule that may have been key to the surprisingly common transition from single-celled ancestors to today’s complex, multicellular organisms. 

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image: Molecular Fingerprint Predicts Flu Shot Response

Molecular Fingerprint Predicts Flu Shot Response

By | January 4, 2016

A gene-expression signature correlates with a person’s likelihood of experiencing adverse events after receiving a seasonal flu vaccine, scientists show. 

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image: Fearless about Folding

Fearless about Folding

By | January 1, 2016

Susan Lindquist has never shied away from letting her curiosity guide her research career.

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image: Master Folder

Master Folder

By | January 1, 2016

Meet Susan Lindquist, the MIT biologist who has won numerous accolades for her research on protein folding.

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image: Smooth Move

Smooth Move

By | January 1, 2016

In the mouse lung, hardening of a blood vessel can result from just a single progenitor cell forming new smooth muscle.

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image: Discoverer of G Proteins Dies

Discoverer of G Proteins Dies

By | December 29, 2015

Nobel laureate Alfred Gilman has passed away at age 74.

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image: Domestication’s Downsides for Dogs

Domestication’s Downsides for Dogs

By | December 21, 2015

The selection of traits suitable for human companionship may have dragged along some unfavorable alleles.

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image: Year in Review: Hot Topics

Year in Review: Hot Topics

By | December 21, 2015

In 2015, The Scientist dove deep into the latest research on aging, HIV, hearing, and obesity.

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image: Cancer Not Just “Bad Luck”

Cancer Not Just “Bad Luck”

By | December 18, 2015

A new study refutes one published earlier this year that claimed random mutations were at the root of many tumors.

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image: One Gene, Two Disorders

One Gene, Two Disorders

By | December 11, 2015

Researchers link different mutations in a single gene to autistic and schizophrenic phenotypes in mice.

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