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Cancer Sequencing Controls

By | April 15, 2015

Comparing a patient’s tumor DNA sequence with that of her normal tissue can improve researchers’ identification of disease-associated mutations.

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image: Mother’s Genes Influence Baby’s Bacteria

Mother’s Genes Influence Baby’s Bacteria

By | April 13, 2015

A breast milk-associated gene mutation impacts the establishment of a newborn’s gut microbiome, a study suggests.

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Potentially Harmful Stowaways

By | April 8, 2015

Researchers report an estimate of the average number of recessive lethal mutations people carry.

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Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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The Challenges of Precision

By | April 1, 2015

Researchers face roadblocks to treating an individual patient’s cancer as a unique disease.

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From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

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Ebola Mutation Rate Quibble

By | March 27, 2015

A study suggests that the virus may not be evolving as quickly as a previous group estimated.

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Genome Nation

By | March 27, 2015

Researchers perform whole-genome sequencing on roughly 1 percent of the Icelandic population.

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Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2015

March 2015's selection of notable quotes

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