Advertisement

The Scientist

» mutations and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Neglected Babies Develop Less Myelin

Neglected Babies Develop Less Myelin

By | September 17, 2012

Mice raised in isolation from their mothers developed cognitive deficits similar to those of babies raised in orphanages where physical contact is infrequent.

2 Comments

image: Finding Injury

Finding Injury

By | September 1, 2012

The brain’s phagocytes follow an ATP bread trail laid down by calcium waves to the site of damage.

0 Comments

image: Kartik Chandran: Chemistry Kid

Kartik Chandran: Chemistry Kid

By | September 1, 2012

Associate Professor, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Age: 38

0 Comments

image: Space-bound Fish

Space-bound Fish

By | July 31, 2012

Japanese astronauts deliver an aquarium to the International Space Station to study the effects of microgravity on marine life.

0 Comments

image: Sweet Smell of Success

Sweet Smell of Success

By | July 1, 2012

With persistence and pluck, Leslie Vosshall managed to snatch insect odorant receptors from the jaws of experimental defeat.

2 Comments

image: Fewer Mutations in Tumor Mitochondria

Fewer Mutations in Tumor Mitochondria

By | June 7, 2012

Contrary to existing dogma, colon cancer cell mitochondria carry fewer mutations than mitochondria of normal body cells.

1 Comment

image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

5 Comments

image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

0 Comments

image: Hacking the Genome

Hacking the Genome

By | June 1, 2012

In pondering genome structure and function, evolutionary geneticist Laurence Hurst has arrived at some unanticipated conclusions about how natural selection has molded our DNA.

6 Comments

image: Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

By | May 7, 2012

Human-specific duplications of a gene involved in brain development may have contributed to our species’ unique intelligence.

6 Comments

Advertisement
RayBiotech
RayBiotech

Popular Now

  1. Staying Active in the Lab
    Careers Staying Active in the Lab

    Retiring as a professor, and even shutting down your own lab, doesn’t necessarily mean quitting research.

  2. When Does a Smart Mouse Become Human?
  3. The Lies That Scars Tell
    Notebook The Lies That Scars Tell

    Macaque trainers in Bangladesh are often bitten by their monkeys, but rarely infected by a particular simian retrovirus.

  4. Antibiotic Resistance Can Boost Bacterial Fitness
Advertisement
Advertisement
The Scientist