The Scientist

» mutations and disease/medicine

Most Recent

image: Zika Infects Neural Progenitors

Zika Infects Neural Progenitors

By | March 4, 2016

Scientists provide a potential biological link between Zika virus infection and microcephaly.

2 Comments

image: First Uterus Transplant in U.S.

First Uterus Transplant in U.S.

By | March 1, 2016

Less than six months after a woman in Sweden gave birth to a healthy baby from a transplanted womb, doctors in Cleveland begin a clinical trial to test the procedure in 10 US women.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2016 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Desperately Seeking Shut-Eye

Desperately Seeking Shut-Eye

By | March 1, 2016

New insomnia drugs are coming on the market, but drug-free therapy remains the most durable treatment.

0 Comments

image: In Dogged Pursuit of Sleep

In Dogged Pursuit of Sleep

By | March 1, 2016

Unearthing the root causes of narcolepsy keeps Emmanuel Mignot tackling one of sleep science’s toughest questions.

0 Comments

image: Go To Bed!

Go To Bed!

By | March 1, 2016

The immediate consequences of losing out on sleep may be harbingers of long-term repercussions.

0 Comments

image: Pig-to-Pig Transmission of Mosquito-Borne Virus

Pig-to-Pig Transmission of Mosquito-Borne Virus

By | February 29, 2016

The Japanese encephalitis virus, which typically moves to new hosts via mosquito vectors, can jump directly between pigs, according to a study.

0 Comments

image: Week in Review: February 22–26

Week in Review: February 22–26

By | February 26, 2016

Questions about how E. coli evolves; spermatids in a dish; fighting bacteria with virus-like molecule; what drives metastasis; antibodies fight Ebola in monkeys

0 Comments

image: Mutations Not Tied to Metastasis

Mutations Not Tied to Metastasis

By | February 25, 2016

Clinical cases link immune changes to a cancer’s spread through the body, but find no role for so-called “driver” mutations.

3 Comments

image: Similar Data, Different Conclusions

Similar Data, Different Conclusions

By | February 23, 2016

By tweaking certain conditions of a long-running experiment on E. coli, scientists found that some bacteria could be prompted to express a mutant phenotype sooner, without the “generation of new genetic information.” The resulting debate—whether the data support evolutionary theory—is more about semantics than science.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Exercise Boosts Telomere Transcription
  2. Neurons Compete to Form Memories
  3. Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised
  4. The Genetic Components of Rare Diseases
RayBiotech