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image: Cancer Not Just “Bad Luck”

Cancer Not Just “Bad Luck”

By | December 18, 2015

A new study refutes one published earlier this year that claimed random mutations were at the root of many tumors.

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image: When the Flu Vax Fails

When the Flu Vax Fails

By | December 16, 2015

The status of a person’s immune system can predict when a seasonal flu vaccination will not provide sufficient protection, according to a study. 

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image: One Gene, Two Disorders

One Gene, Two Disorders

By | December 11, 2015

Researchers link different mutations in a single gene to autistic and schizophrenic phenotypes in mice.

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image: Global Food-Related Disease Estimate

Global Food-Related Disease Estimate

By | December 7, 2015

More than 400,000 people—including 125,000 children—die from foodborne illness every year, according to the World Health Organization.

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: The Regenerator

The Regenerator

By | December 1, 2015

In his search for effective therapies for Parkinson’s disease, Lorenz Studer is uncovering pluripotency switches and clues to what makes cells age.

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image: BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

By | November 30, 2015

The cancer-related protein BRCA1 is important for learning and memory in mice and is depleted in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, according to a study.

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image: Cortical Census

Cortical Census

By | November 26, 2015

Scientists document the characteristics and connections of mouse neocortical neurons to establish the most detailed microcircuit map to date.

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image: Fatal-Disease Drug in Limbo

Fatal-Disease Drug in Limbo

By | November 25, 2015

A panel of experts advised the US Food and Drug Administration that BioMarin Pharmaceutical has not demonstrated efficacy of its new drug for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

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image: How Gastric Bypass Can Kill Sugar Cravings

How Gastric Bypass Can Kill Sugar Cravings

By | November 19, 2015

A type of bariatric surgery eliminates gut-to-brain signals that trigger sugar highs, a mouse study shows.  

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