Advertisement
Cellular Research
Cellular Research

The Scientist

» mutations, ecology and evolution

Most Recent

image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

0 Comments

image: Roos Are Mainly South Paws

Roos Are Mainly South Paws

By | June 22, 2015

A new study shows that kangaroos are predominantly left-handed.

1 Comment

image: Spider and Centipede Venom Remarkably Similar

Spider and Centipede Venom Remarkably Similar

By | June 12, 2015

The predatory toxins employed by animals separated by millions of years of evolution are virtually identical, a study shows.

0 Comments

image: Tippling Chimps Caught in the Act

Tippling Chimps Caught in the Act

By | June 10, 2015

Researchers in Africa observe chimpanzees stealing palm wine from villagers’ cups and imbibing the beverage.

0 Comments

image: Spiky-Headed Dino Discovered

Spiky-Headed Dino Discovered

By | June 8, 2015

Dubbed “Hellboy,” the triceratops relative sports a bevy of horns on its crested cranium.

0 Comments

image: Mosaic Mutations May Not Be Rare

Mosaic Mutations May Not Be Rare

By | June 5, 2015

Somatic mosaicism may be responsible for a larger proportion of genomic variability within humans than previously thought.

2 Comments

image: NCI Gets Personal

NCI Gets Personal

By | June 2, 2015

The National Cancer Institute is launching a Phase 2 trial matching patients with specific mutations to drugs tailored to those genetic changes.

0 Comments

In the prologue, “Lemurs and the Delights of Fieldwork,” author Ian Tattersall shares the paleoanthropological lessons he learned from studying non-human primates in Madagascar.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | June 1, 2015

How to Clone a Mammoth, The Upright Thinkers, The Thirteenth Step, and Humankind

0 Comments

image: Reimagining Humanity

Reimagining Humanity

By | June 1, 2015

As the science of paleoanthropology developed, human evolutionary trees changed as much as the minds that constructed them.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. The Sum of Our Parts
    Features The Sum of Our Parts

    Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.

  2. Most Earth-like Planet Found
  3. Ancient Viruses as Gene Therapy Vectors
  4. Judge Decides on GM Rice Retraction
Advertisement
PDA
PDA
Advertisement
Life Technologies