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image: Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

By | April 28, 2016

Baby fish show fewer signs of stress in the presence of large fish that scare off midsize predators. 

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image: Advances in Genome Editing

Advances in Genome Editing

By | April 20, 2016

Researchers develop a CRISPR-based technique that efficiently corrects point mutations without cleaving DNA.

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image: Genetic Resilience

Genetic Resilience

By | April 11, 2016

An analysis of the genomes of nearly 600,000 healthy individuals reveals a handful of people who appear resistant to certain genetic disorders.

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image: A Tree  Takes Root

A Tree Takes Root

By | April 1, 2016

Four apparently unrelated individuals share a common ancestor from whom they inherited a rare mutation that predisposed them to the cancer they share.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Parallel Plagues

Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.

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image: Pulling It All Together

Pulling It All Together

By | April 1, 2016

Systems-biology approaches offer new strategies for finding hard-to-identify drug targets for cancer.

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A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.

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image: Mutations Not Tied to Metastasis

Mutations Not Tied to Metastasis

By | February 25, 2016

Clinical cases link immune changes to a cancer’s spread through the body, but find no role for so-called “driver” mutations.

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