The Scientist

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image: Parallel Plagues

Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.

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image: Pulling It All Together

Pulling It All Together

By | April 1, 2016

Systems-biology approaches offer new strategies for finding hard-to-identify drug targets for cancer.

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A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.

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image: Mutations Not Tied to Metastasis

Mutations Not Tied to Metastasis

By | February 25, 2016

Clinical cases link immune changes to a cancer’s spread through the body, but find no role for so-called “driver” mutations.

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image: Similar Data, Different Conclusions

Similar Data, Different Conclusions

By | February 23, 2016

By tweaking certain conditions of a long-running experiment on E. coli, scientists found that some bacteria could be prompted to express a mutant phenotype sooner, without the “generation of new genetic information.” The resulting debate—whether the data support evolutionary theory—is more about semantics than science.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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image: Keep Off the Grass

Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

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image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

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image: Domestication’s Downsides for Dogs

Domestication’s Downsides for Dogs

By | December 21, 2015

The selection of traits suitable for human companionship may have dragged along some unfavorable alleles.

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image: Cancer Not Just “Bad Luck”

Cancer Not Just “Bad Luck”

By | December 18, 2015

A new study refutes one published earlier this year that claimed random mutations were at the root of many tumors.

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