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image: Stripes Shoo Flies

Stripes Shoo Flies

By | April 4, 2014

Zebras evolved stripes to prevent pesky biting flies from landing on them, a study finds.

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Speaking of Science

By | April 1, 2014

April 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | March 12, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Week in Review: March 3–7

Week in Review: March 3–7

By | March 7, 2014

The gene behind a butterfly’s mimicry; the evolution of adipose fins; bacteria and bowel cancer; plants lacking plastid genomes

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image: Convergent Fish Fins

Convergent Fish Fins

By | March 5, 2014

Adipose fins, long considered vestigial, may have evolved multiple times as a key adaptation in some fish, study finds.

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image: Flashy Deep Sea Fish

Flashy Deep Sea Fish

By | March 5, 2014

Fish with complex light-emitting photophore patterns may be primed to split into new species.

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image: More Mutations in Girls with Autism

More Mutations in Girls with Autism

By | March 4, 2014

A greater number of genetic mutations among autistic girls, compared to their male counterparts, suggests that the female brain can better handle such variations.  

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Contributors

By | March 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Discovering Archaea, 1977

Discovering Archaea, 1977

By | March 1, 2014

Ribosomal RNA fingerprints reveal the three domains of life.

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image: Early Evidence

Early Evidence

By | March 1, 2014

Fossilized structures suggest that mat-forming microbes have been around for almost 3.5 billion years.

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