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image: To Retain a Brain

To Retain a Brain

By | January 1, 2016

Exceptional neural fossil preservation helps answer questions about ancient arthropod evolution.

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image: Maintaining Cooperation

Maintaining Cooperation

By | January 1, 2016

How organisms keep their biological partners from cheating


image: Ancient Irish

Ancient Irish

By | December 30, 2015

The genomes of a 5,200-year-old woman and three 4,000-year-old men yield clues about the founding of Celtic populations.


image: Domestication’s Downsides for Dogs

Domestication’s Downsides for Dogs

By | December 21, 2015

The selection of traits suitable for human companionship may have dragged along some unfavorable alleles.


image: Cancer Not Just “Bad Luck”

Cancer Not Just “Bad Luck”

By | December 18, 2015

A new study refutes one published earlier this year that claimed random mutations were at the root of many tumors.

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image: Dog Origins Disputed

Dog Origins Disputed

By | December 17, 2015

A genomic study suggests that dogs diverged from wolves in Southeast Asia 33,000 years ago, contrary to reports placing their origins elsewhere on the continent.


image: Constant Evolution

Constant Evolution

By | December 16, 2015

Bacteria growing in an unchanging environment continue to adapt indefinitely.


image: Mining the Mite-ochondrial Genome

Mining the Mite-ochondrial Genome

By | December 14, 2015

Phylogenetic analysis of DNA isolated from human hair follicle–dwelling mites shows that different lineages of the arthropods are associated with hosts with different regional ancestries.


image: One Gene, Two Disorders

One Gene, Two Disorders

By | December 11, 2015

Researchers link different mutations in a single gene to autistic and schizophrenic phenotypes in mice.


image: Owl Be Darned

Owl Be Darned

By | December 4, 2015

Researchers studying city-dwelling birds are learning about which animals are more suited to urban life.

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