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image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

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image: Opinion: The Fatality Burden

Opinion: The Fatality Burden

By | December 17, 2013

Some gain-of-function influenza research poses a significant public health threat and should be banned.

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image: H6N1 Can Affect Humans

H6N1 Can Affect Humans

By | November 14, 2013

Taiwanese scientists confirm the first person to have been infected by the H6N1 strain of avian flu.

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image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: Evolution of H7N9

Evolution of H7N9

By | September 20, 2013

Genetic diversity helped avian influenza A viruses make the leap from birds to humans, researchers report.

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image: Multiple Bird Flu Threats Lurk

Multiple Bird Flu Threats Lurk

By | August 23, 2013

The avian influenza virus H7N7, a cousin to H7N9, has been found in Chinese live poultry markets.

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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

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image: Bird Flu Spreads Between People

Bird Flu Spreads Between People

By | August 7, 2013

The H7N9 avian flu strain appears to have been transmitted from human to human for the first time, but its ability to jump between people is limited.

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