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image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

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image: Effects of BPA Substitutes

Effects of BPA Substitutes

By | April 11, 2016

Two studies add to the evidence that replacements for the plastic additive affect cells and animals in the same, untoward ways as bisphenol A.

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image: Microbial Recycler Found

Microbial Recycler Found

By | March 14, 2016

Researchers discover a new species of bacteria that can break down a commonly used plastic.

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image: An Ocean of Plastic

An Ocean of Plastic

By | December 15, 2014

A new study surveys the extent of the plastic problem in the world’s oceans, estimating more than 5 trillion pieces weighing nearly 250,000 tons.

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image: Plastic Reefs

Plastic Reefs

By | July 17, 2013

Plastic fragments are changing the ecology of the oceans by providing havens for bugs and bacteria.

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image: Ocean Plastic Aid Insects

Ocean Plastic Aid Insects

By | May 10, 2012

Floating pools of plastic debris in the Pacific offer more surfaces for marine insects to lay eggs.

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image: Dryer Lint Reaches Oceans

Dryer Lint Reaches Oceans

By | October 24, 2011

Microscopic fibers shed by your clothes in the wash are making their way to the oceans round the world, where they could harm marine organisms.

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