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» E. coli and immunology

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image: One Bad Apple

One Bad Apple

By | June 24, 2011

A unique virus and the worm it infects turn up in an orchard outside of Paris.

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image: Top 7 in immunology

Top 7 in immunology

By | June 21, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in immunology and related areas, from Faculty of 1000.

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image: Keeping immunity in check

Keeping immunity in check

By | June 16, 2011

Two newly discovered proteins that act as brakes to slow a plant's immune response after infection may provide clues to autoimmune treatments.

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image: Sprouts spawn deadly <em>E. coli</em>

Sprouts spawn deadly E. coli

By | June 13, 2011

Authorities conclude contaminated beans and bean sprouts from a German farm were the source of the recent E. coli outbreak in Europe.

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image: <em>E. coli</em> outbreak source still a mystery

E. coli outbreak source still a mystery

By | June 7, 2011

The source of the deadly bacterial infections remains unknown.

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image: Top 7 in vaccination

Top 7 in vaccination

By | June 6, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in vaccination and related areas, from Faculty of 1000

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image: Approaching Universality

Approaching Universality

By | June 5, 2011

Pitfalls and triumphs on the way to complete vaccine protection.

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image: The Anatomy of a High

The Anatomy of a High

By | June 3, 2011

When someone snorts or smokes cocaine, which is composed of small crystalline alkaloid molecules, the drug enters the bloodstream and from there eventually crosses into the heart, brain, and other organs. 

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image: Part Human, Part HIV

Part Human, Part HIV

By | June 3, 2011

Like other enveloped viruses, HIV exits its host cell enshrouded in the cell’s membrane, which contains membrane molecules such as the human leukocyte antigens (HLA). 

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image: <em>E. coli</em> epidemic baffles doctors

E. coli epidemic baffles doctors

By | June 3, 2011

A highly virulent strain of E. coli that has already killed two people and infected around 800 (most of whom live or had visited northern Germany) has proved an enigma for epidemiologists. 

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