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» E. coli, developmental biology and immunology

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

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image: Ancient Apoptosis

Ancient Apoptosis

By | June 9, 2014

Humans and coral share a cell-death pathway that has been conserved between them for more than half a billion years.

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image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

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image: Parsing Pathogens

Parsing Pathogens

By | June 1, 2014

Meet the peptide-covered microcantilever device capable of differentiating subtypes of Salmonella.

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image: Immunology and Neurology Pioneer Dies

Immunology and Neurology Pioneer Dies

By | May 24, 2014

Gerald Edelman, who broke new ground in two distinct fields of life science, has passed away at age 84.

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image: Border Collies vs. <em>E. coli</em>

Border Collies vs. E. coli

By | May 21, 2014

A study shows that the herding dogs can be an effective means of controlling bacterial infections spread by seagulls.

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image: Augmenting the Genetic Alphabet

Augmenting the Genetic Alphabet

By | May 7, 2014

For the first time, synthetic DNA base pairs are replicated within living bacteria.

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image: Long-Distance Call

Long-Distance Call

By | May 1, 2014

Neurons may use interferon signals transmitted over great distances to fend off viral infection.

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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