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image: Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

By | May 1, 2012

From accounts of deformed animals to scratch-and-sniff technology, Robert Boyle's early contributions to the Royal Society of London were prolific and wide ranging.

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image: Anti-inflammatory Factors Fight Bugs

Anti-inflammatory Factors Fight Bugs

By | April 25, 2012

A combination of antibiotics and the body’s own defensive metabolites clears bacterial infections faster than antibiotics alone.

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image: The Two Faces of Metastasis

The Two Faces of Metastasis

By | April 1, 2012

During development, the cells of an embryo change their pattern of gene expression, which allows them to detach from their original location and migrate to another part of the embryo, where the pattern changes again to allow formation of a new organ.

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image: Are Cancer Stem Cells Ready for Prime Time?

Are Cancer Stem Cells Ready for Prime Time?

By | April 1, 2012

A flood of new discoveries has refined our definition of cancer stem cells. Now it’s up to human clinical trials to test if they can make a difference in patients.

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image: How to Make Eyeball Stew

How to Make Eyeball Stew

By | March 1, 2012

Editor's choice in developmental biology

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image: Model Citizen

Model Citizen

By | March 1, 2012

With an eye to understanding animal regeneration, Alejandro Sánchez Alvarado has turned a freshwater planarian into a model system to watch.

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image: How Tigers Get Their Stripes

How Tigers Get Their Stripes

By | February 22, 2012

For the first time researchers have demonstrated the molecular tango that gives rise to repeating patterns in developing animal embryos.

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image: Cell Change Up

Cell Change Up

By | February 9, 2012

Imaging cell cytoskeletons during early embryonic development leads researchers to uncover a new regulator of cell shape

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image: The Making of a Trait

The Making of a Trait

By | January 26, 2012

Populations of organisms acquire beneficial traits repeatedly and rapidly through co-evolution with other species and through gene interaction.

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image: Iron Builds a Better Brain

Iron Builds a Better Brain

By | January 9, 2012

Brain imaging and gene analyses in twins reveal that white matter integrity is linked to an iron homeostasis gene.

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